Thoughts on: Silence, Full Throttle Remastered and Tiny Echo

It’s time for some pointing and clicking. I decided to give a shot to a sequel to a game that was pretty popular and a remaster of an old classic, but in between them, a tiny little adventure decided to give me an extra hour of adventuring. Let me tell you what I think of Silence, Full Throttle Remastered and Tiny Echo.

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Thoughts on: Broken Age and Day of the Tentacle Remastered

The golden age and return of the adventure games. At least, that’s how a lot of people might think about Day of the Tentacle and Broken Age. Day of the Tentacle has always been considered one of the best examples of point and click adventures and was the first game with Tim Schafer having a leading role in development (after the first two Monkey Island games where he was a co-writer). Broken Age was the first huge gaming Kickstarter success marketed as the glorious return of adventure games, also from Tim Schafer and his current team at Double Fine. Given that I personally never liked Day of the Tentacle much and there were some really good adventure titles in the late 00s (especially those from Wadjet Eye) to make the Broken Age’s claims to “return” to something not make a lot of sense, I was really interested in playing those games back to back. The result was amusing, but not particularly exciting.

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O tempora: Bayonetta (PC)

My O tempora posts tend to be about older titles, than 2009, the year Bayonetta was released originally in Japan. But Bayonetta became a milestone release, a new classic that ushered a new era of “stylish action” games and gave the Capcom alumni at PlatinumGames a much needed boost, despite the lower than expected sales. In addition, the core gameplay has been evolved and perfected so much since then it’s interesting to look back at where it started. But now on PC, with a surprisingly solid port.

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O tempora: Unreal II: The Awakening

O tempora is a series of retrospective posts where I play games from ages before to see if they stood the test of time.

Last years of 20th century and first years of 21st were really interesting for FPS game genre. The genre was slowly turning from fun mindless shootouts to story-driven events with Half-Life being the example most tried to follow. There was some resistance to this idea – Serious Sam being the best example of that, a mindless action game where you killed hordes of enemies with only basic outline of a plot. But most developers tried to go for something very cinematic, something that mixes shooting with other elements and ideas. In between release of Unreal 1 (released just half a year before Half-Life) and release of Unreal II we had Halo, Kingpin, Jedi Knight 2, Return to Castle Wolfenstein, several Medal of Honor games, Aliens versus Predator 2, Undying, Red Faction and even Metroid Prime (which is not a pure FPS, but a hybrid) all trying out very different often innovative things and new ways to mix storytelling and first person shooting. And then we have Unreal II, which at the time of release received mixed reviews and was completely ignored by me. Was it really that weak? Hahahaha, oh I couldn’t even predict how much.

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O tempora: Unreal Gold

O tempora is a series of retrospective posts where I play games from ages before to see if they stood the test of time.

Unreal – the name probably came from just how beautiful the game looked at the time of release. Yet, for me and my friends back in the day the name became a joke – it was “unreal” to make it work with a respectable fps count, unless you had a really powerful PC. And my friends didn’t. So we could either play the game on much lower settings or watch the amazing jaw-dropping slideshow of a game. And that was one of the main reasons why I’ve never actually played the game properly until now. I have played all the “Tournament” games (which I won’t be covering), but both singleplayer Unreal games passed me by. Was the game all looks, or did it really have something good about it?

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